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Christian America According to Alexis de Tocqueville

When I read the following account of Alexis de Tocqueville, I almost wanted to hoist my flag and place my right hand over my heart. Sadly, a quick look at Washington with its conniving cadre of corruption- from the president down- screams how far de Toqueville’s America has drifted from the religion and freedom he so admired. We are a nation cursed; evidenced by the occupant in the WH and Scripture is clear how this happened:

(Psalms 33:12) Blessed is the nation whose God is the LORD; and the people whom he hath chosen for his own inheritance.

On APRIL APRIL 16, 1859, French historian Alexis de Tocqueville died.

After nine months of traveling the United States, he wrote Democracy in America in 1835, which has been described as “the most comprehensive…analysis of character and society in America ever written.”

Alexis de Tocqueville wrote:

“Upon my arrival in the United States the religious aspect of the country was the first thing that struck my attention…

In France I had almost always seen the spirit of religion and the spirit of freedom marching in opposite directions. But in America I found they were intimately united and that they reigned in common over the same country…”

De Tocqueville continued:

“The Americans combine the notions of Christianity and of liberty so intimately in their minds, that it is impossible to make them conceive the one without the other…

They brought with them into the New World a form of Christianity which I cannot better describe than by styling it a democratic and republican religion.”

In Book Two of Democracy in America, de Tocqueville wrote:

“Christianity has therefore retained a strong hold on the public mind in America…

In the United States…Christianity itself is a fact so irresistibly established, that no one undertakes either to attack or to defend it.”

Islam vs. Christianity according to de Tocqueville

In the 1840’s. Alexis de Tocqueville traveled twice to Algeria. He wrote to Arthur de Gobineau, October 22, 1843 (Tocqueville Reader, p. 229):

“I studied the Koran a great deal. I came away from that study with the conviction there have been few religions in the world as deadly to men as that of Mohammed…

It is the principle cause of the decadence so visible today in the Muslim world…Its social and political tendencies are in my opinion to be feared…

I therefore regard it as a form of decadence rather than a form of progress.”

Alexis de Tocqueville stated in Travail sur l’Algerie in uvres completes, 1841:

“I came back from Africa with the pathetic notion that at present in our way of waging war…

If our sole aim is to equal the Turks, in fact we shall be in a far lower position than theirs: barbarians for barbarians, the Turks will always outdo us because they are Muslim barbarians.”

In Democracy in America, 1840, vol. II, bk. 1, ch. V, de Tocqueville wrote:

“Mohammed brought down from heaven and put into the Koran not religious doctrines only, but political maxims, criminal and civil laws, and scientific theories.

The Gospels, on the other hand, deal only with the general relations between man and God and between man and man. Beyond that, they teach nothing and do not oblige people to believe anything.

That alone…is enough to show that Islam will not be able to hold its power long in an age of enlightenment and democracy, while Christianity is destined to reign in such age, as in all others.”

In Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville wrote:

“In the United States the sovereign authority is religious…

There is no country in the whole world where the Christian religion retains a greater influence over the souls of men than in America, and there can be no greater proof of its utility…than that its influence is powerfully felt over the most enlightened and free nation of the earth.”  [1]


[1] Source: Faith in History by William Federer

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